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The events of 2020 and the prominence of the BLM movement has pushed the subject of race relations to the forefront of our national conversation.  Entering into the realm of honest discussion on race at any level is a personal decision. For the process to be effective, self-evaluation, an open mind, and willing vulnerability are required. Are you equipped for this?  The fact is, many of us have rarely or never engaged in frank, honest conversation about race.

How do you feel about the prospect of honestly discussing your position and responsibility on race related issues? Reluctant? Interested? Suspicious? Eager? Not interested? Why is that?

What should be one’s approach, attitude, and sense of responsibility be when entering into  honest discussions about race?

What mistakes can one make when discussing race and how can those mistakes be avoided?

Are you afraid that you may be judged to be politically incorrect or uninformed if you share your true feelings? Yes? No? Can you briefly explain?

How might your neighborhood or local community benefit from open discussion about race?

Please share your thoughts below.

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Rob Sayre
Rob Sayre
3 days ago

There are a couple of things that I think have help me feel better equipped to talk about race with others. One is reading and understanding the historical background of race in the US. In the last 2-3 years I have read several books about Reconstruction, a biography of Frederick Douglas and US Grant.The experiences below perhaps have as well. I renovate and own properties, sometimes renting, sometimes selling. In this role I have encountered black and hispanic families whose lives have exploded or suffered huge challenges, such as domestic violence, job and income loss and because of this, my… Read more »

James Edgerly
James B Edgerly
Admin
15 days ago

I have been engaging in extensive discussions on race on a daily basis for about six months now. My approach has been to simply listen with sincere interest. I have not done much talking at all, and have expressed almost no opinions. I am just listening. That’s my approach for right now and I feel like it is working. I am learning a lot and people seem to be willing to talk with me.

Roger Wetherall
Roger Wetherall
23 days ago

Although I originally come from Australia, I have been interested in the complexities of black-white relations since I moved to this country. Yet I am still hesitant to broach the subject because of the intense emotions and reactions that it brings up in people no matter where they stand. I feel that it is important to make a distinction between White Supremacy, Racism, Unconscious of Conscious Prejudice, Cultural Differences and Miss-understandings. Many times, we mistake one for the other and make a bigger deal out of a slight or misunderstanding than what is intended. I do believe that simply developing… Read more »

Anne-Marie Mylar
Anne-Marie Mylar
24 days ago

The word “race” and “racism” was never part of my youth. I was raised in a small town in France. However, as soon as I stepped on to the American soil at the age of 22 I became aware of these words. I don’t argue with people if what I think is irrational or simply very different from my point of view. I simply stop talking. I am told that I am very strong and project strength and therefore “people don’t want to mess with me”. I have been told that recently again – and I am 70 years old.… Read more »

James Edgerly
James B Edgerly
Admin
Reply to  Anne-Marie Mylar
15 days ago

Hello Anne Marie – I have read you comments with interest. Regarding terminology, in recent conversations we have been using the term European as a descriptor, rather than Caucasian or White. That seems to be working well. Another issue of terminology: We understand there is a single human race, so why do we refer to the Black Race or the White Race or European Race, or Asian Race? This terminology seems to imply fundamental differences that recent science is telling us are not really there. Perhaps a more appropriate term is “Tribe.” In a recent talk at the Unification Theological… Read more »

Anne-Marie Mylar
Anne-Marie Mylar
Reply to  James B Edgerly
11 days ago

Hi Jim, I completely agree with your very last sentence, “So I think racial or tribal differences are important to God, and therefore should be appreciated and valued by us.” Words are just that “words” which can be interpreted to fit someone’s feeling. What is important is for the reader to understand the heart of the individual using that particular word. I will not debate on a lot of stuff because I am not well read. I am a nurse by trade, and a bookkeeper. But discussions that involved a lot of doctoral papers won’t be my forte. I do… Read more »

Roger Wetherall
Roger Wetherall
Reply to  Anne-Marie Mylar
22 days ago

Unconditional apologies from the white race is one part of the solution, but unconditional forgiveness from those who have been wronged is the other half. Only then, can both sides be truly freed and liberated to become brothers again.

Anne-Marie Mylar
Anne-Marie Mylar
Reply to  Roger Wetherall
11 days ago

You are correct Roger.
Forgiveness won’t be true unless apologies are from the heart and come first.
I think, in any situation (even small conflict between kids for example), the individual who is in the wrong has to be the first to act in order to give a chance to the person who suffered because of the wrong can have the ability to forgive.
Anne-Marie

James Edgerly
James Edgerly
Admin
Reply to  Roger Wetherall
13 days ago

Perhaps the “Comfort Women” history between Korea and Japan is a related story that can offer lessons? I understand, despite panels and commissions, resolution of that terrible history continues to be an an impass. Apparently, resolution has been blocked because nationalism, particularly on the Korean side, has taken priority over facts.

Perhaps we should have a conversation in this forum on the “Comfort Women” history. It may teach us lessons that can be applied to reconciling the atrocities of racism in the U.S.

Roger Wetherall
Roger Wetherall
Reply to  James Edgerly
12 days ago

I recently had an interesting conversation with a Japanese-Ameican woman about the Comfort Women issue. It seem that no matter how many times Japan apologizes for this, it is never enough to satisfy the Koreans. Holding on to a grudge is like slowly drinking poison and expecting the other person to die! The ones who are really hurt by this are actually the Koreans, in that they lose the opportunities for better trade arrangements and to cooperate more with their island neighbors. Perhaps there are lessons here that we can learn that can be applied to the ‘race’ issue.

Chris Noble
Chris Noble
25 days ago

My impression is that most people in the US have made up their mind. They either believe that racism is still systemic and widespread, or they believe that it is yesterday’s problem, and that today we are dealing with economic and social inequalities that are not race-based. Only a small fraction of people seem to be willing to stand between these two very different beliefs and consider both of them with an open, fact-seeking and solution-focused perspective. The people who have made up their mind, on both extremes, are not “equipped to talk about race”.

Kate Tsubata
Kate Tsubata
25 days ago

I personally hate the idea of “tolerance” of each other’s racial, ethnic, linguistic, or faith identities. It seems like enduring some irritant. I feel we need to honor, to cherish, to celebrate our special characteristics. If we look at each other for the amazing qualities God has endowed, not only in the very broad distinction of race, but the much more narrow distinctions of one’s individual characteristics and strengths, what emerges is wonder and amazement at God’s vast and profound genius. Many can marvel at nature’s complexity and beauty, but the complexity and brilliance of each human person is far… Read more »

Bruce
Bruce
1 month ago

How do you feel about the prospect of honestly discussing your position and responsibility on race related issues? Reluctant? Interested? Suspicious? Eager? Not interested? Why is that? Hello my Brother James. I have been working this subject and created a website to discuss it. GOTO: https://www.adlcendingracism.org/ What should be one’s approach, attitude, and sense of responsibility be when entering into honest discussions about race? Real Talk for Ending Racism  was intended to create the balance between truth about the history and origin of the construction of “color based power and control” i.e the Doctrine of Discovery (https://www.adlcendingracism.org/cultural-genocide) and how this was the… Read more »

Jeremiah Tobin
Jeremiah Tobin
Reply to  Bruce
24 days ago

I believe in one race: the human race. But, as far as history goes, I find the treatment of the Native American appalling. We did steal their land. But, that is not the first time that has happened. Everywhere the English and Spanish landed they tried to enslave the native population and steal the country (others as well but not as globally). As far as the hue and cry about slavery in America, the Irish were slaves here long before the Africans were. They called them indentured servants but they were managed in such a was as to never be… Read more »

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