Skip to content

What is Your Diagnosis of the “Race” Problem in the U.S.?

What is the state of black-white race relations in the United States? We’ve all had plenty of time to read the news, watch the media, talk privately. Please consider this question carefully and let us know what you think. We are not asking you (yet) for your solution, just your diagnosis.

There seems to be a very wide spectrum of opinions on this topic. 

At one end of the spectrum is the damning verdict of Critical Race Theory (CRT). CRT teaches that the U.S. is irretrievably rotten to the core. The “woke” consider racism in the U.S. to be so oppressive, so entrenched, so profoundly systematic, that it can’t be fixed without a wholesale change in our national identity and political order. 

At the other end of the spectrum is the view that racism in the U.S. is a thing of the past. We have made steady progress: Abolitionist Movement, the Civil War, Civil Rights legislation, de-segregation, affirmative action. It’s now time to move on. Let’s stop hitting our head against the wall over racism so we can sharpen our focus on strengthening our families and communities.

So, at one end of the spectrum is the diagnosis that the U. S, is “rotten to the core.” At the other end of the spectrum is: “we’ve delt with it, so let’s move on.

Do you agree with this definition of the spectrum of perspectives on the race problem in the U.S? If not, please present an alternative.

Where do you stand? What is your assessment of the status of black-white race relations in the U.S.?

Please share your thoughts below.

Notify me
Notify of
guest
18 Conversation additions
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
John Williams
John Williams
10 days ago

I appreciate the question, and the comments below. I think it is fair to say that “rotten to the core” is an exaggeration, but it is closer to the truth than the other alternative you present. Racism and the tolerance of slavery was that original sin in the founding of the country, and it has continued to allow atrocities to be committed all through our history. And it persists as a key problem holding us back from fulfilling our ideals. My time working in a prison near Newark, NJ, made systemic racism undeniable to me, if it had ever been questionable before. I’m grateful for the shocking instances of racial injustice in our history and present society to be coming out now–we’ve got to stop kidding ourselves about a few “bad apples” and “unfortunate incidents.” White superiority and entitlement are so entrenched in the culture–I see it in my own… Read more »

Chris Noble
Chris Noble
29 days ago

I think we need to move towards being a society where one’s racial identity is a private matter, like religion now is, and where it is illegal for public or private institutions to collect “race” data. Everyone is entitled to define their own religion, and to congregate with others who have the same definition. But your religion, a private matter, does not give you or your group special rights versus people who identify with a different religion (or none). The same should be the case for race. Unfortunately, we seem to be moving in the opposite direction, where everyone is labelled with an arbitrary and official category of “race”, and government policies will affect you differently depending on which “race” category you claim or has been assigned to you. “Equity” should be replaced by “equality”.

Sunder Willett
Sunder Willett
1 month ago

I didn’t know that sundown towns were a thing (look it up) or redlining or that the GI bill was not applied to Black servicemen thus shutting them out of the American Dream that so many White servicemen gained access to. (And of course, the brutal history of Indian occupation and cultural genocide. Look of the Carlisle School for one example.) I didn’t know about the American-Filipino War (after we colonized them) where some 200-300 thousand Filipinos died fighting for independence or about how the US government has overthrown the governments of Iran, South Vietnam, Guatemala, Panama, Congo, and others. I hadn’t grown up receiving talks from my parents about how I need to be careful around police, that I need to be extra cautious when stopped, that I have to be slow in my movements and that I shouldn’t always call the police in times of trouble. Rather I… Read more »

Bruce Sutchar
Bruce Sutchar
1 month ago

The other day my wife and I each responded to the immediate establishment of the Juneteenth national holiday. I taught in the inner city of Chicago. I don’t believe there are any differences because of skin color, but there are differences because of economics and family make-up. My parents stayed married all of their life. How anyone can grow up without both parents is amazing. The value of a family cannot be overstated. Every child needs two parents, as well as an extended family, to support their emotional development. I watch my children doing their best to raise their babies. Even though there are two parents, a lot of additional help is needed raise their children. It’s not about race. It’s about family

Sunder Willett
Sunder Willett
1 month ago

Frankly, I think CRT is just a convenient boogeyman for the “right” ( In this case, I define “right” as right-wing media and Republican politicians) to drum-up support for Republican and conservative causes. I mean I listened to the 1619 Project and I didn’t find anything particularly offensive. I think it is unfair to say that CRT is just about saying the US is “rotten to core”. Rather it’s a response to the inaccuracy of how US history has been taught for decades. I didn’t learn about the history of black-white race riots (or race massacres) in high school, the expulsion of 95% of all Chinese immigrants from the West in the 1870s, the anti-Catholic movements of the 1800s, or how the US government refused to support Black Americans after the Civil War. Rather I just learned that the KKK sprung up after the Civil War, then Southern States instituted… Read more »

Lorman Lykes
Lorman Lykes
1 month ago

When I think about the controversy of critical race theory, I am reminded that not long ago the idea of a “love race” was proposed that created skepticism. The transition to a “love race” culture has a foundation centered on true education theory. It promotes an adherence to the Three Great Blessing written in Genesis and explained in Divine Principle as a means of educating humans on their divine purpose and value for peace and prosperity. This includes education on the Fall of Man to understand the human frailties that lead men away from achieving a loving community for all races. Thus education is vital to the restoration process. Education to understand the “original sin” of slavery as America’s foundation and the reality of institutional racism that followed is an opportunity for Americans both white and black. Critical race theory is not focused on blame. Whoever believes that is suffering… Read more »

Lorman Lykes
Lorman Lykes
1 month ago

I want to thank James Edgerly for addressing one of today’s most crucial and sensitive topics for all Americans. Despite the lofty and revolutionary goal of the Founding Fathers to create a democratic republic, universality of American full citizenship was denied to minority groups and women until the 20th century. In my opinion, one of the symptoms of this injustice was the diminution of personal identify development from birth of all races. This was and is a primary factor in the lack of a true self image that would have promoted true family values at the inception of this nation. Both blacks as descendants of formally enslaved people and whites whose ancestors may or may not have owned slaves are suffering from various degrees of trauma, shame, guilt and other forms of undiagnosed mental neurosis. These neuroses are at the root of personality disorders that have affected some of our… Read more »

Frank Bell
Frank Bell
1 month ago

That there is such an incompatiable range of opinion, is itself an issue. That there is now a Juneteenth day as well as a Martin Luther Kings Birthday is an encouraging sign that there is some sort of breakthrough possible whihc is encouraging. I am from New Zealand. While there are no full blooded Maoris there, it seems possible that there are not any full blooded African Americans in the U.S. either, but I haven’t seen any discussion of that. A few years ago a terrorist bombed and shot a lot of people in two Mosques in Christchurch. The Prime Minister, Jacinta Ardern, said that “In New Zealand, WE are all part of US. However this terrorist is not part of us.” He was from Australia, but isn’t representative of Australians. Here, in the U.S. can WE say that WE are all part of US? Unfortunately, this doesn’t appear to… Read more »

Jeremiah Tobin
Jeremiah Tobin
1 month ago

There is only one race! The HUMAN RACE! The sooner people realize that the sooner all the hate will end. On forms that ask for race I click other and if there is a space to explain I put, “Human.” I invite you to do the same.

Craig Smith
Craig Smith
1 month ago

As the song in Avenue Q says, everyone is a little bit racist. It can be benign, and easily overcome.

The biggest problem we are facing, however, is not white supremacy, but the race hustlers who use it as an excuse to divide us up by race.

If we are divided, it is far easier for leaders to manipulate us to get what they want, to our detriment.

The other thing I see is the confusion of race and culture. There are less savory things in every culture, but to defend those less savory parts by calling the person who points it out “racist” is inaccurate and not at all helpful.

Craig Smith
Craig Smith
Reply to  James Edgerly
1 month ago

Certainly. Often people who are critical of rap or hip hop are called racist, as if only one race does rap and hip hop, and everything in rit is perfectly fine and acceptable, when it is not. Lyrics in those genres are very often extremely misogynistic and advocating violence against police. You speak out against those lyrics, often you are simply waved off as a racist.

18
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x

Be the First to Know