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Today’s turbulence reminds me of the 1960s anti-war movement, which I experienced during my first year at the University of California, Santa Barbara. I quickly became disenchanted with what felt like hopeless solutions being offered by angry people. My question became: If every person’s worldview is equally valid — is there any hope for harmonious, peaceful solutions that could bring everyone together?

Eventually I became convinced that there is indeed a natural source of universal values that’s simple for everyone to understand. I realized that the source is the family, where we can all personally assimilate values like love, cooperative interdependence, selfless service — ultimately, shared prosperity.

Of course, no two families are alike. Furthermore, families in today’s world face any number of unexpected trials. Without exception, every family faces struggle, turmoil and heartbreak.

Yet it’s perfectly easy to understand the ideal of the responsible, loving family as the “school of love.” The family’s where I learned the physical, emotional, and spiritual values essential to social peace and prosperity.

What do you think are the underlying requirements key to sustainable peace? What would it take to meet those requirements?

Do you think there’s a way of achieving peace without shared universal values?

Given that so few experience an ideal family life, is it realistic to look to the family as the source of the experiences necessary to achieve that ideal societally?

If there are “universal values”, what are they? How should they be acquired and disseminated?

Please share your thoughts below

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Kate Tsubata
Kate Tsubata
20 days ago

To me, the value of the family is in allowing us to love in various directions, and with various personalities. It’s typical in a family that someone’s expertise in a given area is noted–and relied upon–by others. Each person can self-develop, according to their interests and talents–and can benefit from others’ specialties. So, if Grandma makes the best bread, and Grandpa loves coaching baseball, and Mom loves reading and Pop loves tinkering with engines and Auntie can paint beautiful pictures and Uncle can get anything to grow…the child learns that we can be unique, diverse and part of a network… Read more »

Jack Ashworth
Jack Ashworth
26 days ago

If there are universal values, the Golden Rule has to be one of them, and probably the 10 commandments for starters. When I was growing up in the 50’s, we were taught these values in school and in our church as well as at home. Ideally we are born into families that pass on the basic values of goodness, but beyond that, I believe we need to re-imagine the role of public education as the purveyor universal values of goodness as well as the 3 R’s. It would also be helpful if religious leaders played a more public role in… Read more »

Jeremiah Tobin
Jeremiah Tobin
26 days ago

I guess I’m really lucky. My sister and I are both in our 80’s but are close in heart and communicate often even though she is in California and I am here in New Jersey. We have always been close. When we were young people thought that we were twins.

David Eaton
David M Eaton
27 days ago

I have 11 siblings. Some are married, some are single, some are divorced. Some are religious, some are not. Some are conservative, some are liberal. Some are artistic, some are not. Some are athletic, some are not. Some did well financially, some didn’t. One is a recovering alcoholic, another has Downes Syndrome. But we are family and that’s what keeps us in a mode of respect and understanding and we can still get together for the holidays, though not all of us share the same feelings about certain holidays.

Jeremiah Tobin
Jeremiah Tobin
Reply to  David M Eaton
26 days ago

Your family inheritance is why you are such a great person. Your personality was shaped in the family. God has Blessed you greatly, David.

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